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the ball rolling. jumping around a little bit but woodrow wilson had potomac fever which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson. watchful waiting was very closely associated with woodrow wilson. first in his relationship to the dictatorship in mexico where there was a lot of feeling that we should go in and intervene in mexico where there was a fairly active of ackley dictatorship and wilson said no this is watchful waiting. and once the war started world war i that was attributed back to wilson and using the word watchful waiting. for whatever reason watchful waiting is used in the diagnosis of certain illnesses where rather than treat them immediately you go through period of watching and waiting so that is a more serious one. some of them are -- and mckinley wayne mckinley the spanish-american war starting a mckinley has a telephone in the is the telegraph. he clears out the room and sets up a telegraph and pulls down a map and he says this is my war room. that were did not exist before then. still jumping around its coolidge, calv
to get along with a democratic-controlled congress. woodrow wilson was the target of republican party that wanted to even many a squabble they had with the president. he defeated both william howard taft and theodore roosevelt to win his first term. he spearheaded liberal legislation they opposed, and got approval of the league of nations that would be selected to vent republican party hostility to wilson. the treaty was never approved. the votes were there for approval, but the president allowed compromise, but wilson stood firm. it was the president, not congress, that refused to compromise. one of the most successful relationships between a president and congress occurred during the second administration of bill clinton. he had encouraged the democratic party to move more closely to the center politically well before he ran for president. his welfare legislation reflected that. his success in working with newt gingrich and republicans and formulating debt and debt reduction legislation that led to a budget surplus is the cornerstone for success of working with the opposing party to
around a little bit and woodrow wilson had potomac fever, which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson, watchful waiting was very appropriate. first with his relationship with dictatorship in mexico, feeling that we should go in and intervene wilson said no, this is watch and wait. once the war started, world war i, that was attributed back to him. for whatever reason, it is now primarily used in the diagnosis of certain illnesses. rather than treat them immediately, you go through a period of watchful waiting. some words like lucretius are interesting. mckinley -- the spanish-american war started. he has a telephone, telegraph, and he clears up the room and says up the telephone and declares this is my war room. that term did not exist until then. still jumping around, you know, it is calvin coolidge who comes down from massachusetts where he's put down a police strike and he goes to the convention and he is the law and order candidate. it was the first time it had ever been used as a political motto. there are a couple of things that
, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had potomac fever which was something harry truman love offed to quote. -- loved to quote. watchful waiting was very closely associated with woodrow waiting first in his relationship to the dictatorship in mexico where there was a lot of feeling that we should go in and intervene in mexico where there was a fairly active and ugly dictatorship afoot, and wilson said, no, this this is watchful waiting. we're going to wait and see. and once the world started, world war world war i, that was attributed back to woodrow wilson, that he was using watchful waiting. for whatever reason, watchful waiting is now used in, um, diagnosis of certain illnesses where rather than treat them immediately, you go through a period of watchful waiting. but, so that's one of the more serious ones. some of them are capricious and interesting. you know, mckinley, william mckinley, the spanish-of american war is starting. mckinley's got a telephone, he's got the telegraph, he's got a room full of maps, and he clears out the room, sets up the telephone, sets up the telegra
program, which brennan defended in a speech at the woodrow wilson center last may. >> targeted strikes conform to the principal of humanity, which requires us to use weapons that will not inflict unnecessary suffering. for all these reasons, i suggest to you that these targeted strikes against al qaeda terrorists are indeed ethical and just. >>> also this week, obama chose his chief of staff jack lew, an orthodox jew, to head the treasury department. >>> plans are being completed for president obama's second inaugural, but controversy has already prompted a change. atlanta evangelical pastor louie giglio was selected to give the benediction, but he bowed out after some activist groups criticized a sermon he gave in the 1990s against homosexuality. giglio said he didn't want the uproar to become a distraction. myrlie evers-williams, widow of slain civil rights leader medgar evers, will deliver the invocation. as he did four years ago, president obama will use abraham lincoln's bible when he takes the oath of office. and this time, he will also use a bible of reverend martin luther king,
, 100 years ago, had a chief justice swear in woodrow wilson. that chief justice served in the confederate army. we've come a very long way. and it's because of martin luther king as much as anything. so, i think the president will reflect on that. >> and, donna, the president will be putting his hands on martin luther king's bible, as well as abraham lincoln's bible. but the issue of race is not something he put at the front of his presidency. >> president obama has tried to unify the country on the issue of race. he understands that we have not overcome, in terms of race. that dr. king's dream is very much alive. we haven't fulfilled this dream. this is a very historic year. the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom. this is also an anniversary of megaer evens. and his wife, myrlie evers-williams will speak. >> and he is free to speak out on the second term. >> why not? these are american issues we are talking about. we talk about jobs and the economy. if dr. king were alive today, he would press president obama to end the inequality in our c
. and in 1998, traffic came to a standstill on the woodrow wilson bridge until d.c. police shot the man in the leg with a beanbag. >> i'm not sure there's any way to prevent the aftermath. >> reporter: d-dot practices mock drills. it's important to know that alternative route ahead of time. on the key bridge, surae chinn, 9news. >> we contacted metro police. they say their first priority is to preserve life. non lethal force was not used because the person was above the freeway. police used alerts and twitter to let people know of the situation. >>> according to the wall street journal apple is work on a budget iphone. no comment from apple. >>> this might be a little embarrassing for microsoft. according to guardian, thieves broke into the company's office in silicon valley and the only thing they stole, five ipads worth about three grand. break into microsoft to steal apple products. that is interesting. >> that's more of a statement than anything. >> yeah, it is. they didn't steal any surface tablets, apparently. >>> the weekend we've left untouched temperature-wise. but let's talk a
at the woodrow wilson bridge as traffic seems to be moving along pretty well. we'll check in with julie wright for more in just a second. i'm sarah simmons. >> i'm melanie alnwick. thank you for joining us whether one of our regulars or checking in from out of town. >> glad to have you glad to have tucker as well. >> lots of layers particularly early this morning. temperatures are falling back into the low to mid-30s. we are 35 in town. it will feel cold today. we have sunshine early but we'll cloud up and then eventually things are going to get windy later this afternoon as we have this arctic front that we've been talking about coming in. >> i have my layers ready to go. i know what it is going to feel like. >> not as cold as it was four years ago. >> it will be on the brisk side. >> just north of chicago, there is this arctic front that will be working its way towards us a little later this afternoon. that will set us up for a very cold week. today will be the warmest of this entire week for us with temperatures expected to be in the low to mid-40s. we might make it to 45 degrees for a few
by germa germany. and woodrow wilson, president woodrow wilson was outraged, senate leaders was outraged. how could a small faction allow our ships to go unarmed in a situation where they're being sunk? that's unacceptable. well, that small faction had their reasons. they felt once you put armaments on to a ship, you are probably going to be firing shots. and when you fire shots, you're involved in the war and they wanted to block the u.s. getting involved in the war. but there were only a small group in the senate that believed that that was the right response and that we should just allow germany to continue sinking our ships with -- with no -- no response. and so the senate came together and said, okay, we're going to respond to a small faction objecorinstructing the bill of s body not allowing us to go forward. they've had their say, we've heard them out, they've had their opinions, and we're not going to allow two-thirds to shut down debate and get to a vote. that was 1917. the chamber adopted the first such motion, it's called a cloture motion, as in closing debate. well, that cont
the philippines, the woodrow wilson period. >> and what happens is the concept of communism comes in as many phases in america, but certainly in labor. that ties to the ideas, some of the ideals of socialism, and we see it in all the union members of the 1870s. we see it in a relationship to the french collectives of the 1870s and 1830s. there's working man's right, the progressive movement. it works through american issue. wilson puts a stop on it. he comes down, eugene debs ghosted jail. all these people disappear. they are thrown out of the country because they resist world war i. so these are the forces that are moving america, this wilson movement towards this place we're going to. i'm curious to know what you think those forces are. where the labor movement is going to end up. i think peter and i would argue there are moments in history, and the point where things can truly change, whether can be a wallace that make the convention moment. weather can be -- [inaudible] >> which could turn and could turn again, and maybe have turned in the past. >> wallace came so close. >> i'm just thin
facing the scenario he discussed at the woodrow wilson center five years ago. he did not hesitate to act. soon thereafter, are special operations forces were moving toward the compound in pakistan where we believed the osama bin laden might be hiding. at the end of the day, president obama could confirm justice had been delivered to those responsible for the attacks on september 11, 2001. the-phyllis sullivan law and was armas strategic blow yet. credit for that success belongs to the courageous forces that carries out -- carried out that mission at extraordinary threat to their lives. they pieced together clues over the years that led to his hideout and to president obama, who gave the order to go in. one year later, it is appropriate to assess where we stand in this fight. we said that it would not mark the end of al qaeda nor our resolve to destroy it. along with allies and partners, we have been unrelenting. when we assess that al qaeda of 2012, it is fair to say the united states is more secure and the american people are safer. here is why. in pakistan, al qaeda's leadership ranks
in the parade. little more than a month later, he was assassinated. and for women it wasn't until woodrow wilson's inaugural they were invited to be part of the parade. one mother pushing her turn of the century stroller as they walked into history. two years later, women would begin to vote. fdr's second inaugural, the wettest on record. but listen to this. >> fdr decided if the crowd could brave the elements so could he. >> reporter: he insisted on riding in an open car. >> i harry s. truman do solemnly swear. >> you will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. >> reporter: a tv first for harry truman, january 1949. americans could finally watch the inauguration on television. these were the preps more than 50 years ago for dwight eisenhower, giant platforms for a mere 12,000 invited guests. there were four inaugural balls awaiting them. lyndon johnson made history, after one of the darkest days in america, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. ronald reagan, second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the st
was at the woodrow wilson school and they have resources to offer e caan and stats class's with or without calculus. by the second semester i thought i am ready again. i took it with calculus and gotten beaten up and fortunately this class about calculus was taught by ben bernanke. [laughter] so my hubris is that i did not study courage economics by the current fed chair. that is where i come from. i have come to appreciate the enormous power of these tools but can you tell me why i need to know this? so now i will read a section from chapter five basic probability, do not by the extended warranty on the $99 printer. that you can figure out but this makes me seem a little old but i hope you recall this. >> 1981 the brewing company spent $1.7 million for a shockingly bold and risky marketing campaign for the of brand shall its beer. do you remember? so the campaign did not work. at halftime of the super bowl the company broadcast the alliant taste test schlitz beer against mitt the low. boulder yet, they did not pick a random beer drinker's day picked 100 nickle loeb triggers the culmination of a ca
, richard nixon, to eisenhower, fdr, woodrow wilson, william mckinley, ulysses s. grant, abraham lincoln, anger jackson, james monroe, james madison, thomas jefferson, and george washington. down on the national mall where the crowds are gathering, we have a reporter in the middle of everything. >> right from a capital, in the middle of the national mall, three ladies with us and make the journey to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to be here in washington and to stay overnight. >> probably over $2,000. hotel're able to find a and do all
commute. it is nice and quiet right now. woodrow wilson bridge, if over the american region -- american legion bridge, it looks good. and virginia, it looks good. indeed georgetown, that is -- checking time out fine as well. please take your time. plenty ofyou have distance between you and the car in front of you. be able to see. here.lume right virginia, 395, travel lanes to were the 14th street bridge back to you. thank you so much. what we to talk about reference at the top of the show. big fight over immigration the the president hitting road today. be a bigs expected to priority in his agenda for this year. in with brianne carter to see what we can expect today. in a matter of hours, president obama is expected to lay out his vision for immigration reform. expected to push for border security, cracking down on employers who hire undocumented workers, and earned pathway to -- citizenship for immigrants. senators unveiled a similar plan recently. obama wouldy that largely endorsed the senators efforts. he was heavily supported by -- supporters in in november's election. we talk to pe
. that checks out fine. i want to take you around the beltway. as you head towards the woodrow wilson bridge, getting down to the beltway 95, bw parkway, that was checking out fine. for the early ride on 270, look for a spot on early boulevard. there might be delays. a little bit of an increase for volume. back to you. >> that was a very tight shot. thank you so much. >> 5:41. >> new details on this week's three crash in new york cit >> coming up, knew at 6:00, we will have a lesson in what not to do to win a date with someone. >> also, why the new dreamliner might be a nightmare for boeing. >> we will have the story of the boy who went missing in 1994, found alive and well years later. >> amazing story. looking at news run the nation, relatives of people in the plane crash are suing the company. >> they are saying that he chartered a faulty jet. the unspecified damages -- seven people were killed in the crash in mexico. they included rivera, four of her employees, and to copilots. authorities are trying to figure out what caused the crash. >> the captain of the commuter ferry was blaming me
good. crossing the woodrow wilson bridge, american legion, no troubles. 270, 95, b-w parkway normal. on 29 leading burtonsville and in the four corners and we t heaton, lanes are open. back to you. >> thank you. 45 degrees, 5:11 on this thursday. >> the year is off to an >> you are watching abc 7 "good morning washington." >> president obama dealing with more cabinet changes. secretary of laborer hilda solis plans to resign. she was the nation's first hispanic labor secretary. the white house released a statement calling derek parr her a tireless champion for working families. president obama is expected to nominate white house chief of staff jack lew as secretary of the treasury. he's known as a tough bargainer. some republicans complained that he has been too unyielding on negotiations. his signature will have to be emblazoned on u.s. dollar bills. but you might not be able to read it because his signature is notoriously illegible. >> virginia governor bob mcdonnell urged lawmakers to implement a long-lasting transportation reforms during his state of the commonwealth address. >>
. and for women it wasn't until woodrow wilson inaugural they were invited to be part of the parade. one month pushing her turn of the century stroller as they walked into history. two years later, women would begin to vote. at the second inaugural january 27th but listen to this. he insisted on riding in an open car. >> i harry s. truman do solemnly swear. >> reporter: a tv first for harry truman, january 1949. americans could finally watch the inauguration on television. these were the preps more than 50 years ago for dwight eisenhower giant platforms for the invited guests. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. bill clinton ushering more than a second term. ushering the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again since already making history four years ago. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. right here. i'll see you from washington tomorrow night. good night.
. today, presidents have been borrowing money to fund the federal government since 1917, woodrow wilson, not one of them, not a single one liberal or conservative or republican or democrat or progressive orelon , libertarian has borrowed on his own, overly aftely -- only aftee congress has authorized it. neil: nancy pelosi is willing to take the house out. >> something happens when you get into the minority to suggestion that president could borrow money on his own, who would lend money to just the president, that does not have the full faith and credit of the united states to pay it back. neil: when they talk up a trillion dollar coin that fed compared to a back up -- we're coming up with creative ways around raising the debt without addressing the debt. >> they don'tment to acknowledge that the real problem is spending, they don't want to stop the spending even republicans, who went a long with the so-called, phy fiscal f addressing. neil: this happened almost 50 times, what would a president napolitano do? >> not borrow any more money, and government would live within its means. neil
way to mount the attacks, this from a speech he gave at the woodrow wilson center last december. >> a small number of terrorists with ordinance that can be adapted to avoid harming others in the immediate vicinity. it is hard to imagine what would benefit the citizens than the remotely powered aircraft. similarly, they conform to the principles of humanity, which requires us to use weapons that will not inflict unnecessary suffering. for all of these reasons, i suggest that these targeted strikes against al-qaeda terrorists are indeed ethical and just. >> brennan has also argued there has not been a single collateral death from these, which others debate. he also directs the very creepily named matrix, which includes options for capturing them, or killing them. that means calling in the drones. spencer, you once called brennan the most deadly man in the u.s. government. and the obama administration's angel of death. >> well, also because when john brennan decides it is time for you to die you're probably going to die. the disposition matrix you mention is basically a master list
is now a senior counselor with the common group. -- cohen group. now he is the new director of woodrow wilson center's mexico institute. congratulations on that. he is on the editorial board of foreign affairs, latino america. to get started, let's go ahead and start with you, luis carlos, on the evolution of mexico's political system. what may be the future of mexico's political parties. >> good morning. thank you for this invitation. let me give you a brief overview of what has happened and mexican democracy for the past 20 years or so. i argue in this new book, my guess is that mexico's elections and democracy have had a limited effect on the quality of democracy -- i stayed that mexico's elections and democracy have had a limited effect on the quality of democracy. client ellison got stronger. -- the rule of law is weak, as it was in the 20th century. is not a priority in the minds of most politicians in mexico. in general, mexicans lack of an esteemed for legality. that has been pretty much the same over the past 20 or 30 years. the levels of impunity and mexico continue to be abo
. >> today, leslie kaufman talks about president woodrow wilson or ace like to call him, the greatest president in the history of history. that should get me some air time on glen beck. but just to be sure they are a terrible writer. do you hear that, glen? >> why? >> just wanted to -- getting ad time on the blaze is very, very expensive. >> you are a smart paper. >> i am a scoundrel. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. >> that's new. >> it has been a longtime. >> it has been a long time for both of us. >> we have to catch up later. a couple of drinks at my place? >> what is going on right now? >> he changes your orientation by just staring at you. to the story. little tykes give her fright. the former high school teacher in cinncinati, ohio, is there any other kind, says she has a rare phobia of young children, and she is suing the district for discrimination. she kept her fear in check until 2009. she was transferred to the middle school. she was thrust into a sea of 7th and 8th graders, oh god, causing her blood pressure to spike and forcing her to retire. now the child h
over the legislative branch. it is not until 1913 that a political scientist named woodrow wilson is elected president and said there is nothing to prevent me from going up there, and this would be a great way to present my legislative program. so, wilson starts going in person. he is delighted that he thought of something theodore roosevelt did not think of, and he knew it would drive him wild to think that he missed that opportunity. ever since wilson, almost all president of the united states have taken the opportunity to go to congress in hers and. jefferson -- to go to congress in person. jefferson, as i say, was trying to downplay a lot of the ceremony, but he also understood the need for an inauguration. he understood the purpose of it. after a divisive election, the election of 1800 was one of the most divisive, and everybody has to choose sides, the inauguration is the moment that we all come back together again. this is not a presidential candidate. this is the person that was elected. this is the person that is going to lead the country for the next four years. we need
100 years to woodrow wilson when culver's black force troop served as an escort. >> we are directly across from the reviewing stand where the president and vice president -- they are still there. although, there are some empty seats there. a lot of folks probably are getting ready for the balls already. there are a few more fans, a few more floats. we'll take a quick break and resume our coverage right after this. so if ydead battery,t tire, need a tow or lock your keys in the car, geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our ne
at georgetown university and this year at the woodrow wilson center is a public policy scholar, so occasionally i read books. i talked to lots of veterans and soldiers about going to war and coming home to the suit states. poster with your connection to the naval academy? >> guest: i used to teach at the naval academy for two and half years. as their inaugural distinguished chair in ethics. they had a cheating scandal and there in the limelight being near washington and needed to brainstorm about how to teach ethics, so they called me and. weigh me, that's a good question. i've taught ethics at georgetown for 20 years and some of that before yelena scratcher receipt. and they were surprised there have been people cici affixes part of the curriculum. so we modified the course to talk about character and more and sailors and marines. this absolutely fascinating. poster with your educational background? >> guest: every two bryn mawr college, proud women's college in pennsylvania. and then i had a stint abroad. the second is scotland. then i came back and went to harvard, a phd from harvard in phil
:31 right now. let's take a live look out at the woodrow wilson bridge, shall we? we haven't seen that in a while. look, the traffic is picking up out there, meaning everybody is getting back to work on january 2nd here, 2013. it's going to be a cold start to your day as well, but, tucker, we'll have some slight, gi es, peeks of sunshine, right? >> well, more and more sunshine as the day goes on. so maybe even mostly sunny by afternoon. i mean, it should be a nice looking day. >> good. >> it's going to be typical january with highs only in the low 40s here. but with a lot of sunshine and dry conditions the next couple of days, you know, smooth sailing. >> it's going to be cold. i'll take the sun at least. >> right. yesterday was chilly and we didn't have any sun, so today should feel a little better for you. let's kick off by looking at our radar. we've had a few light sprinkles and light snow flurries to our south and east this morning. they are quickly falling off the map there or pushing east. they're not literally falling off the map. there you go, you can kind of see those ou
office on a sunday was woodrow wilson in 1917. he was sworn in privately in the president's room in the u.s. capitol. the first president to ride to and from his inauguration in an automobile was william harding in 1921. we'll be right back.  . >>> crowds gathered in southwest dc on saturday to honor dr. martin luther king, jr. this was the 35th year of the peace and freedom walk. it began in landsburg park, ending at shepherd park. the group walked across the frederick douglas bridge, recreating dr. king's march from selma to montgomery, alabama. today, a wreath will be laid at the national mall. >>> children's books were gathered yesterday for two local agencies that serve underprivileged families. >>> security, of course, will be enormous for tomorrow's public inauguration. 42 agencies will monitor the districts from a multiagency command center, dubbed the macc. metro is bringing in 150 transit officers from other cities to help move the crowds and park police will patrol the area between 4th and 14th streets, of course where people without tickets can gather and watch the
marching was woodrow wilson. the people are thinking through the symbolism of the event and what they want to communicate to the country. >> younger people may think that the inaugural ceremonies always took place on the west front of the capitol and that's only during recent times. >> only 32 years old. ronald reagan shifted it . he wanted to look out toward his native california. but before that it was on the east front and a very different view. so to go back and look at the pictures before 1981, very different pictures from what you have today. >> anything stand out to you we can expect this time around? >> this has been a contentious few years for the president. he's going to articulate not policies but principles. and try and find a way through roderick toitgie them the language, the words to unite people. the most important thing in a really good inaugural is making a phrase memorable. pass the torch to a new generation. it's not what the country can do for you. with malice with charity toward all. you think back to those memorable lines. that's how you frame the way a country looks
at this important historical moment. my great thanks also to the woodrow wilson center for cohosting this event with us and for their collaboration. mutual admiration society, it is always a pleasure to work with you blair, and with your great team. it is an exceptional opportunity to hold the dialogue as we look forward beyond reconstruction to renew l in haiti at the wilson center, because the wilson center is dedicatedded to open dialogue and actionable idea we hope we will bring fort both. the we look forward to hearing the perspective of the government of haiti, the united states, the region nam perspective of the organization of american states, which is very engaged in haiti. and the perspective civil society organizations implementing program on the ground and those that may -- and from all of you so we may advance these discussions. three years ago today, as blair reminded us, on saturday -- three years ago -- sorry not today. on saturday. a huge earthquake devastated haiti. and just to get us all on the same page. you read the numbers and know the statistic. the direction beyond imagi
wilson center, this is 55 minutes -- hosted by the woodrow wilson center, this is 55 minutes. >> good morning. i am the director and president and ceo of the wilson center. i want to especially welcome the chairman of the board, our board, my boss. member -- and members of the council and alliances. it is an honor to co-host this event with the aspen institute and to welcome ambassadors from bulgaria, canada, costa rica, the czech republic and many others. unlike the washington monument or lincoln memorial, the wilson center is a living memorial to our 28th president. our only ph.d. president is that congress as his ph.d. subject. this center which chartered by congress in 1968. we claim to offer a safe political space for independent research and open dialogue that leads to actionable ideas for the brought policy community. that happens to be the goal of the aspen institute's homeland security and buys a group which i cochair. we are a bipartisan group in counter-terrorism experts. -- group and counter-terrorism experts. we discuss issues and problems and make recommendations to the
an ideology called progress ivism started with woodrow wilson, theodore roosevelt 100 years ago. almost all president -- reagan was an exception, calvin cool hraopblg -- coolidge -- think they can tell us how to live. >>gretchen: you need a doctor right away but he's on strike. coming up, why obamacare could soon make that a reality. >>steve: doctor, can you come in off the picket line? i've got strep throat. what happens when mascots and cheerleaders collide? it ain't pretty. ♪ [ male announcer ] you've reached the age where you don't back down from a challenge. this is the age of knowing how to make things happen. sowhy let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your
-americans joined the parade for the first time at abraham lincoln's second inaugural. woodrow wilson's second, women were included 52 years later. harry truman's 1949 inaugural was the first on television and in 1997, americans could watch the swearing in online for the first time of bill clinton. tweet me your political questions to @gstephanopoulos plus greta is going to answer your questions for this week's web extra. thanks for spending your sunday with us. check out "world news" with david muir and don't forget that "nightline" has a new starting tuesday, 12:35 a.m. i'll see you tomorrow on "gma." >> in the news this sunday. there could be sharks hockey again. nice on an early morning deal between the players and the owners. and a 22-year-old man is dead of a crashing into a light pole in the south bay. all right. louddy conditions over san francisco with some light rain falling over some of our neighborhoods. i'll let you know when you can
at the woodrow wilson center for international scholars, says capriles, who came closer than anyone to unseating the president will likely lead those who want to end the chavez era. >> he will remain, i think, the person that the opposition will put up to run against maduro but i think he's coming from behind and it's also going to be a very difficult, a very short period of time in which to organize another national election. >> reporter: but chavez remains popular, and loved, by half the population. >> ( translated ): i love you, i love you, we need you. >> reporter: one supporter says, "i love you. we need you." a priest adds this prayer. "the cancerous cells be defeated, maduro's been running the country and giving detail-free updates on chavez' health. >> ( translated ): president chavez is conscious of all the circumstances he's living through, which are complex circumstances. he's conscious of the battle he is fighting and he has a spirit of battle as always. >> reporter: here's where the power struggle gets interesting. now that the supreme court has extended the chavez term indefinitely
. whatever you think of woodrow wilson's legacy, teddy roosevelt gave the office a lot of domestic definition and wilson foreign policy definition. could you talk about those two presidents and how they defined what we now think of as the job of the president. >> lincoln was a strong president who exerted executive power. what you have is the assumption was that congress would govern and every once in a while you'd have a strong president. andrew jackson or abraham lincoln. in the 20th century, teddy roosevelt changes that. at one point roosevelt is pushing through some piece of legislation and people were telling him he can't do it, and he gets out a copy of the constitution and he holds up article ii and he says show me here why i can't do this. i think that become the assumption of presidents in the 20th century. if quur you're not specifically prevented from doing it, you can do it. wilson builds on the power of the president, the precedent that teddy roosevelt established. it's franklin roosevelt and the experience during world war ii that really changes the nature of the office and it's
princeton universities graduate college. for instance, president, a presbyterian named woodrow wilson wanted to graduate college located on the main campus. so undergraduates and graduate students would mingle. wilson's adversary, andrew fleming west, wanted to graduate college located where it now is, on a hill a few blocks from the main campus. woodrow wilson was a man of unbending temperament when he was certain he was right, which was almost always. he took his defeat about the graduate college badly. re-signs princeton's presidency, went into politics, and ruined the 20th century. [laughter] i simplify somewhat and exaggerate a bit. i do so to make a point, however. today and for the past century, since woodrow wilson was elected the nation's president, 100 years and one month ago, american politics has been a struggle to determine which of two princetonians best understood what american politics should be. should we practice the politics of woodrow wilson, or princeton's class of 1879? or the politics of james madison, of the class of 1771? what, you may be wondering, has this to do wi
underneath me. and the woodrow wilson school could offer most of the econ classes with or without calculus, and you can decide and by the second semester i was thinking, i'm ready for calculus. so i took it and got beaten up, and unfortunately, the class without calculus was taught by ben bernanke. so my hubris meant i did not study macroeconomics with the current fed chair, which is unfortunate. so, that is where i come from. i have in life -- because i do public policy and things like that -- come to appreciate the enormous power of these tools and the math, but it's about, can you tell me why i need to know this? so what i'm going to read now is a section from chapter 5, which is basic probability. the subtitle its, do not buy the stepped warranty on your $99 printer. that you can probably figure out. instead i'm going to tell you a story some of you may remember. this may seem a little old but i hope you recall this. this is a story that begins the chapter, 1981, the joseph suites brewing company spent 1.7ing me fa dollar for what appeared to be a shockingly bold and risky campaign for
with rutherford hayes. 1917 with woodrow wilson. 19 seven with dwight eisenhower. 1985 with ronald reagan. one today at the white house, one tomorrow at the capitol. guest: it was at the height of the war. his health was failing. they did away with most of the pomp, and had the ceremony on the grounds of the white house. host: a caller on our republican line. good morning. caller: good morning. host: welcome to the program. caller: will george w. bush be remembered as a good president, or a bad president? do you think president bush hurt the republican party? guest: i will leave the second question to the pundits. i am not a pundit. i do not mean to be evasive. as a historian, the world is still too close to the bush years. harry truman was unable to get insurance, and yet we credit him with planting the seed. it set in motion events leading to the current health care plan. george w. bush spoke about the need for immigration reform. he also talked about privatizing parts of social security, more controversially. we will not know for some time the course of those issues. my hunch is, he will be
at the woodrow wilson center and joins me from washington. the killing of ambassador stephens and the attack on the consulate be the lasting memory of hillary clinton's tenure? >> i don't think so. it's an emotional trauma for a secretary of state whose job and performance, frankly, has been pretty flawless over the course of the last four years. but, look, chris stephens and the others were extraordinary americans and had to preside over the destruction of a consulate and the death of the first city ambassador since 1988 is traumatic. and i think it showed up this previous week in some of her responses to the questions in the hearings. >> yeah. and on that, i mean, the fact that she said, you know, it doesn't matter whether it was just some guys out to kill americans or if it was al qaeda at work or there was a protest. will that come back to haunt err hz things get more political if she does run for office? >> it was a strong emotional response, which is completely understandable, particularly in a very partisan washington. but, look, the reality is it does matter, it does matter whether o
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